Why I am a Proud Feminist

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Why I am a Proud Feminist

Claiborne Beurle

Claiborne Beurle

Claiborne Beurle

Claiborne Beurle

Claiborne Beurle '23, Staff Writer

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On January 18, 2020, thousands of women’s rights advocates marched through the streets around the world, from New York City and Washington, D.C. to Los Angeles, Rome, and London.  Despite the snow, wind, and rain, I marched from Columbus Circle to Times Square with a spirit of passion and excitement. Signs, some in support of reproductive rights and others denouncing misogyny in the government, filled West 59th street. 

I personally marched to fight for equality. My strongest belief is that all people are equal and with that comes women’s rights to accessible reproductive health options. To me, marching for equality highlights not only the major issues women face but also the smaller issues happening in everyday life. For example, when people mock feminism with their friends or on social media, they tear women and girls down in ways they can’t possibly know. Without feminists throughout history, girls wouldn’t be in school, and women couldn’t vote, date, or even compete in the workplace. 

I became a strong advocate for women’s rights during my Arts & Society elective last year. Since then, I’ve worked to promote conversations leading to a deeper understanding of women’s rights. During J-term, I was fortunate to be placed in the Women’s Rights Group, and we focused primarily on educating our audience. 

In addition to supporting women via marches, you can also join the Feminism Club – recently launched by Moli Ma’21 and Cessa Lewis’ 23 – right here at SLS. I am a member along with many others. If interested in attending the next meeting, you can email Cessa or Moli for details.